July 20th, 2011: We are currently looking for players! Message me an email address if you’re interested!

Hello,

I am going to be starting an online DnD 4th edition game. I want to start by explaining the specifics, and then a little bit about the setting. Please, if you are interested in this game, send me a PM indicating as such (and include an email addresss) . While I might see the reply here, chances are I’m going to see the PM first, and while this isn’t a “First come, first served” scenario, being first in line never hurts.

Below is a long form of what I’m looking for. I know it’s a lot to read, but here’s a quick summary:

  • Home brew world,
  • Non-combat played over message board (not sure where yet),
  • Combat scheduled and played over MapTools whenever possible,
  • Looking for 4 dedicated players who will invest time in the world and the game,
  • No rules layers,
  • Combat will be a part of this game. Expect the occassional “dungeon crawl”,
  • Come to the table with a character you’re interested in playing, and I’ll give you a story.

As far as the more concrete stuff:

  • 4th Edition,
  • Using the character builder,
  • Level 1 to start (I know, groan, but you’ll grow …),
  • Point buy (witholding info on that until I get players),
  • Limits on non-core material, but anything will be allowed if it can be reasonably justified.

And now, onto the long part … Skip this if you want, but it took me a bit to type, so I’d appreciate if you glanced over it.

How We Will Play:
Because we all have lives, the game is exclusively online. We will do all non-combat activity through play by post / a forum. I have not found a home for that forum yet, but as the die rolling will be minimal, it really doesn’t matter. I’ll set that up once we get closer.

Play by post can be cumbersome when it comes to combat. Therefore, when battles happen, I will attempt to schedule a Maptools session. Those will be in EST, and will be almost exclusively for the combat portions of the game. This will help the battles flow faster, but will help keep the players using one singular medium (the posts) for characterization. If I have to, battles will go over the forum. I won’t let the game slow down because we can’t find a mutually beneficial time to punch a goblin in the face.

What I Want / Don’t Want From My Players:

I want players who will take the game “seriously”. I put that in quotes, because I think the literal translation of the word doesn’t work. Here’s what I mean by serious:

  • You respect the game world. This means you’ve put some effort into being a part of it. You acknowledge that there are threats, and you treat the NPCs and the settings as your character would.
  • You respect the other players. This means that you agree to have a good time with these people, regardless of whether or not your elven rogue and his dwarven berserker “are buddies”.
  • You respect other player’s characters. Again, it doesn’t mean you have to like them. It means that you give everyone a chance to “shine”, and in turn, they’ll do the same for you. This is especially important in roleplaying scenarios, I believe.
  • You respect your own character. Come to the table with something you’re interested in. Let me help turn it in new directions. But always respect what you built. When your wizard loses a sword fight, acknowledge that’s to be expected, and that’s part of what makes him great.

What I DON’T want is:

  • Rules laywers. I know the rules, but I sure don’t have them memorized.
  • 100% comedians. I want there to be roleplaying as much as combat. Guys who fart at the king and then slap the queen and then look at the DM expecting a laugh will get one. But it’ll be an evil laugh. And then your character will be killed by a minature black hole. And THEN I’ll laugh for real. Seriously, have fun and laugh, but don’t come here looking for a microphone and a spotlight.
  • Combat-All-The-Time folk. I won’t give a percentage on roleplay vs. combat, but it’ll be ample amounts of both.

Backgrounds and Character

When it comes time, background is important. Moreso than class and race, usually. Therefore, while I won’t ask all players to write formal, long backgrounds, I will require that all characters have some form of background supplied to me before we start. One of the things that I will look for in a background is a personal story arc that i can use to draw you into the game world.

Also note, I am a fan of the “if you didn’t say it, I get to make it up” philosophy. So if you say you have a brother, and then don’t mention him again, expect him to show up on my terms …

Everyone will get a story arc that involves them and their background directly, without question!
The Game World

The Game is officially called “Morwold: The Bridge”. The game takes place in a very typical homebrew world. Here’s some details on the specific area you’ll start in:

Four years ago, a clan of Dwarves in the Northern Mountain Rim happened across a honeycomb of old tunnels and cracks in the mountain. Their excavations and curiosity led them through, where they discovered a massive city located on a plateau of the mountain, never before seen by modern eyes. The city was huge in scale, with doorways and ruins far too big to be populated by anything but the largest of giants. Treasures and knowledge abounded, and the Dwarves reaped most of it.

Of specific note, the city – named “Crestwall” by the Dwarven people – had a massive stone bridge that lead off into the fogs beyond the border of the world. It took time, but the curiosity of the modern world lead the Dwarves and a few others to cross that bridge, looking for whatever mysteries lay on the other side.

Those who went were never heard from again. Months later, the bridge and mountains trembled as massive giants thundered across the bridge, storming through what they claimed was their old home, and rampaging across the lands. They slaughtered all that they saw, from Dwarves and Elves to Goblins and Men. They made no claims as to why they were doing such terrible deads, and made no offers of peace. No threats. No warnings. They simply ravaged the lands, shattering mountains and forests with their weapons of war.

The conflicts of the Mainlands took a back seat, as old enemies put their differences aside to find a way to stop the massive creatues from destroying all life. Wars were forgotten, and soldiers of opposing flags stood side by side to repel the attack. One could say a new age of cooperation started under the heel of the monster’s boots.

Even combined, the strength of the Mainlands wouldn’t be enough. The monsters would soon swarm the lands, cross the seas and destroy everything.

Or they could’ve.

On one night, without warning, they lifted their dead upon their shoulders, burned what they couldn’t carry, and returned across the bridge. They were pursued, pushed the whole way by whole armies of Men and Dwarves, but as they faded into the fog of the bridge, no one followed.

That was a year ago.

Morwold isn’t the same place it was back then, four years ago, before they came. Most of the Dwarven population was killed, and the Northern Mountain Rim is more of a gravesite than anything else. Old conflicts between Humans sprouted back up quickly, as the opportunity for war and despicible acts arouse out of collective weakness. The Elves, stunned by the events that so badly damaged their numbers, retreated into deeper seclusion. And the Goblins, who’d for so long been the brunt of similiar war advances from Humans, now found their numbers so much greater that their attacks became brave and calculated.

With the world in such shambles, adventurer’s guilds have changed from homes for bright eyed token seekers to hovels, where hooded soldiers with wounds and scores to settle make rest. The guilds are the only form of protection that most of the outlying towns and villas have, since the soldiers of the formal armies have been recalled to the major cities. So, with all these factors in mind, it’s something of a golden age for a strong-armed adventurer.

Interested?

If you’re interested, please PM me your user name, and an email I can use to get in touch with you! You can reply here, but I won’t guarantee anything. PM first, forum second. I tend to be impatient, so the faster you reach out to me, the faster we can get started.

As I receive emails, I’ll be taking the addresses and the conversation over to email, as that’s a faster / better means of communicating at this stage. So be ready for emails, and more importantly, ready to answer them.

You CAN tell me what kind of character you WANT to play, but I won’t be recording this information until I have the player base. Then, we’ll all discuss it together.

Questions?

Cheers, and thanks for reading. Long, I know, but I needed to make sure the ad was attractive (and hopefully, it was) …

Thanks!

Zippercomics

Hello,

I am going to be starting an online DnD 4th edition game. I want to start by explaining the specifics, and then a little bit about the setting. Please, if you are interested in this game, send me a message indicating as such (and include an email addresss!).

Below is a long form of what I’m looking for. I know it’s a lot to read, but here’s a quick summary:

  • Home brew world,
  • Non-combat played over message board (not sure where yet),
  • Combat scheduled and played over MapTools whenever possible,
  • Looking for 4 dedicated players who will invest time in the world and the game,
  • No rules layers,
  • Combat will be a part of this game. Expect the occassional “dungeon crawl”,
  • Come to the table with a character you’re interested in playing, and I’ll give you a story.

As far as the more concrete stuff:

  • 4th Edition,
  • Using the character builder,
  • Level 1 to start (I know, groan, but you’ll grow …),
  • Point buy (witholding info on that until I get players),
  • Limits on non-core material, but anything will be allowed if it can be reasonably justified.

And now, onto the long part … Skip this if you want, but it took me a bit to type, so I’d appreciate if you glanced over it.

How We Will Play:

Because we all have lives, the game is exclusively online. We will do all non-combat activity through play by post / a forum. I have not found a home for that forum yet, but as the die rolling will be minimal, it really doesn’t matter. I’ll set that up once we get closer.

Play by post can be cumbersome when it comes to combat. Therefore, when battles happen, I will attempt to schedule a Maptools session. Those will be in EST, and will be almost exclusively for the combat portions of the game. This will help the battles flow faster, but will help keep the players using one singular medium (the posts) for characterization. If I have to, battles will go over the forum. I won’t let the game slow down because we can’t find a mutually beneficial time to punch a goblin in the face.
*
What I Want / Don’t Want From My Players:*

I want players who will take the game “seriously”. I put that in quotes, because I think the literal translation of the word doesn’t work. Here’s what I mean by serious:

  • You respect the game world. This means you’ve put some effort into being a part of it. You acknowledge that there are threats, and you treat the NPCs and the settings as your character would.
  • You respect the other players. This means that you agree to have a good time with these people, regardless of whether or not your elven rogue and his dwarven berserker “are buddies”.
  • You respect other player’s characters. Again, it doesn’t mean you have to like them. It means that you give everyone a chance to “shine”, and in turn, they’ll do the same for you. This is especially important in roleplaying scenarios, I believe.
  • You respect your own character. Come to the table with something you’re interested in. Let me help turn it in new directions. But always respect what you built. When your wizard loses a sword fight, acknowledge that’s to be expected, and that’s part of what makes him great.

What I DON’T want is:

  • Rules laywers. I know the rules, but I sure don’t have them memorized.
  • 100% comedians. I want there to be roleplaying as much as combat. Guys who fart at the king and then slap the queen and then look at the DM expecting a laugh will get one. But it’ll be an evil laugh. And then your character will be killed by a minature black hole. And THEN I’ll laugh for real. Seriously, have fun and laugh, but don’t come here looking for a microphone and a spotlight.
  • Combat-All-The-Time folk. I won’t give a percentage on roleplay vs. combat, but it’ll be ample amounts of both.

Backgrounds and Character

When it comes time, background is important. Moreso than class and race, usually. Therefore, while I won’t ask all players to write formal, long backgrounds, I will require that all characters have some form of background supplied to me before we start. One of the things that I will look for in a background is a personal story arc that i can use to draw you into the game world.

Also note, I am a fan of the “if you didn’t say it, I get to make it up” philosophy. So if you say you have a brother, and then don’t mention him again, expect him to show up on my terms …

Everyone will get a story arc that involves them and their background directly, without question!
The Game World

The Game is officially called “Morwold: The Bridge”. The game takes place in a very typical homebrew world. Here’s some details on the specific area you’ll start in:

Four years ago, a clan of Dwarves in the Northern Mountain Rim happened across a honeycomb of old tunnels and cracks in the mountain. Their excavations and curiosity led them through, where they discovered a massive city located on a plateau of the mountain, never before seen by modern eyes. The city was huge in scale, with doorways and ruins far too big to be populated by anything but the largest of giants. Treasures and knowledge abounded, and the Dwarves reaped most of it.

Of specific note, the city – named “Crestwall” by the Dwarven people – had a massive stone bridge that lead off into the fogs beyond the border of the world. It took time, but the curiosity of the modern world lead the Dwarves and a few others to cross that bridge, looking for whatever mysteries lay on the other side.

Those who went were never heard from again. Months later, the bridge and mountains trembled as massive giants thundered across the bridge, storming through what they claimed was their old home, and rampaging across the lands. They slaughtered all that they saw, from Dwarves and Elves to Goblins and Men. They made no claims as to why they were doing such terrible deads, and made no offers of peace. No threats. No warnings. They simply ravaged the lands, shattering mountains and forests with their weapons of war.

The conflicts of the Mainlands took a back seat, as old enemies put their differences aside to find a way to stop the massive creatues from destroying all life. Wars were forgotten, and soldiers of opposing flags stood side by side to repel the attack. One could say a new age of cooperation started under the heel of the monster’s boots.

Even combined, the strength of the Mainlands wouldn’t be enough. The monsters would soon swarm the lands, cross the seas and destroy everything.

Or they could’ve.

On one night, without warning, they lifted their dead upon their shoulders, burned what they couldn’t carry, and returned across the bridge. They were pursued, pushed the whole way by whole armies of Men and Dwarves, but as they faded into the fog of the bridge, no one followed.

That was a year ago.

Morwold isn’t the same place it was back then, four years ago, before they came. Most of the Dwarven population was killed, and the Northern Mountain Rim is more of a gravesite than anything else. Old conflicts between Humans sprouted back up quickly, as the opportunity for war and despicible acts arouse out of collective weakness. The Elves, stunned by the events that so badly damaged their numbers, retreated into deeper seclusion. And the Goblins, who’d for so long been the brunt of similiar war advances from Humans, now found their numbers so much greater that their attacks became brave and calculated.

With the world in such shambles, adventurer’s guilds have changed from homes for bright eyed token seekers to hovels, where hooded soldiers with wounds and scores to settle make rest. The guilds are the only form of protection that most of the outlying towns and villas have, since the soldiers of the formal armies have been recalled to the major cities. So, with all these factors in mind, it’s something of a golden age for a strong-armed adventurer.

Interested?

If you’re interested, please give me an email I can use to get in touch with you! You can reply here, but I won’t guarantee anything. The email is essential! I tend to be impatient, so the faster you reach out to me, the faster we can get started.

As I receive emails, I’ll be taking the addresses and the conversation over to email, as that’s a faster / better means of communicating at this stage. So be ready for emails, and more importantly, ready to answer them.

You CAN tell me what kind of character you WANT to play, but I won’t be recording this information until I have the player base. Then, we’ll all discuss it together.

Questions?

Cheers, and thanks for reading. Long, I know, but I needed to make sure the ad was attractive (and hopefully, it was) …

Thanks!

Zippercomics

Morwold: The Bridge